(Source: infact)

Ed Ruscha, The Music From The Balconies, 1984

Ed Ruscha, The Music From The Balconies, 1984

nedhepburn:

Future Islands
Seasons (Waiting On You) 

If I ever actually do a gym #selfie, I need one of you to punch me in the face.  (at Blink Fitness)

If I ever actually do a gym #selfie, I need one of you to punch me in the face. (at Blink Fitness)

(Source: lookbookdotnu, via bromo-aj)

tvhangover:

Orange Is The New Black Season 2 Trailer

(Source: bismal, via nosdrinker)

Lots of nostalgia associated with being uptown at night.

Lots of nostalgia associated with being uptown at night.

"Camp taste is by its nature possible only in affluent societies, in societies or circles capable of experiencing the psychopathology of affluence."

Susan Sontag (via thisisjustgreat)

ryanmat:

YSL High Top Roller Skates 

for when you need to be disco, but high fashiunz disco.

I truly do not mind working every Saturday.

I truly do not mind working every Saturday.

nosdrinker:

everyone who likes coconut water is lying

un-gif-dans-ta-gueule:

Imogen Cunningham (1929)

un-gif-dans-ta-gueule:

Imogen Cunningham (1929)

(via confessionsofamichaelstipe)

“I don’t know that I can say it’s art, but I think it’s weirder that Pace would show them than that he would make them.” —Cindy Sherman on James Franco’s new show | Gallerist

James Franco, New Film Still #58, 2013

“I don’t know that I can say it’s art, but I think it’s weirder that Pace would show them than that he would make them.” —Cindy Sherman on James Franco’s new show | Gallerist

James Franco, New Film Still #58, 2013

art-conservation:


The discerning collector Grenville L. Winthrop, A.B. 1886, LL.B. ’89, bought this alleged Goya portrait of Maria Isabella de Bourbon, infanta of Spain (1741-1763) from a New York dealer in 1936. He gave it to the Fogg Art Museum in 1943, where it was considered genuine, although several scholars had doubts. Goya expert F.J. Sanchez-Canton, visiting from the Museo Nacional del Prado in the early 1950s, declared the painting a forgery on the basis of its modern surface. Conservator Elizabeth H. Jones wrote at the time of the “curious oily slickness of the paint.” The canvas was old, and the paint bore the crackle marks of age.
An x-ray image of the painting in 1954 revealed the presence of an earlier portrait of a woman beneath the surface, but a woman with a longer face. Analysis also proved the use of zinc white paint, invented after Goya’s death. Cleaning showed that the paint surface was indeed relatively modern and had been applied lightly enough so as not to obscure the craquelure of the original. The base painting, thought to be a Spanish provincial work of about 1790, was not in good shape; the face may have been partially abraded by the forger.
Conservators left some of the modern surface in place so that what we see today is a face half by the forger and half by his predecessor—useful for teaching and a result Jones characterized as a “split personality in paint.”

[via]

art-conservation:

The discerning collector Grenville L. Winthrop, A.B. 1886, LL.B. ’89, bought this alleged Goya portrait of Maria Isabella de Bourbon, infanta of Spain (1741-1763) from a New York dealer in 1936. He gave it to the Fogg Art Museum in 1943, where it was considered genuine, although several scholars had doubts. Goya expert F.J. Sanchez-Canton, visiting from the Museo Nacional del Prado in the early 1950s, declared the painting a forgery on the basis of its modern surface. Conservator Elizabeth H. Jones wrote at the time of the “curious oily slickness of the paint.” The canvas was old, and the paint bore the crackle marks of age.

An x-ray image of the painting in 1954 revealed the presence of an earlier portrait of a woman beneath the surface, but a woman with a longer face. Analysis also proved the use of zinc white paint, invented after Goya’s death. Cleaning showed that the paint surface was indeed relatively modern and had been applied lightly enough so as not to obscure the craquelure of the original. The base painting, thought to be a Spanish provincial work of about 1790, was not in good shape; the face may have been partially abraded by the forger.

Conservators left some of the modern surface in place so that what we see today is a face half by the forger and half by his predecessor—useful for teaching and a result Jones characterized as a “split personality in paint.”

[via]